VaultDisk® is now available for the Dell Precision 3520

VaultDisk Removable Boot SSD for Dell Precision 3520 Workstations

VaultDisk® is a drive bay built into Small Form Factor PCs and Laptops that allow for the VaultDisk® SSD boot drive to be easily accessed and removed from the system. Once the drive is ejected, it can be cloned, stored safely, swapped out for a different OS or allow the system to boot into an OS with security clearance to access various network security levels. DIGISTOR has provided VaultDisk® solutions for many Small Form Factor machines, as well as beefy desktop-replacement workstation laptops in the past. Now VaultDisk® is available for the 15” Dell Precision 3520, a lighter, thinner, yet still very powerful workstation laptop.

This workstation has quickly become a favorite among system administrators for its speed and highly upgradable capacity.  Now that the 15” laptop can be shipped with custom drive bays that host the flexible, bootable VaultDisk® drives, it’s an even more attractive option for professionals required to switch in and out of multiple networks and security levels. With VaultDisk®, the SSD can be swapped with the convenience of an old school floppy drive, without exposing the inner workings of the device itself. For professionals working in the federal, defense, and security industries, this combination of flexibility, power and performance is a no brainer.

VaultDisk Removable Boot SSD for Dell Precision 3520 Workstations

Don’t Get Caught With Your Pants Down

Here at Digistor we’re aware of the concern over recent high-profile data breaches – but did you realize the same scalable solution Facebook is implementing for a complete revamping of their secure storage backups is already available to you as a consumer? The need for worry-free systems that offer as much – or as little – space as you need is growing for companies and individuals, alike.

Repeated Violations of Privacy Are More Scandalous than Leaked Photos.

Right on the heels of the cringe-inducing publicity of several high profile hacked iCloud accounts that left a nation of casual cloud-storage users feeling vulnerable, comes another system attack that should have every responsible vendor searching for more secure options.

Home Depot has confirmed that on Monday that hackers were able to break into the chain’s in-store payment systems in what could be the largest known data breach of any retail company’s computer network. According to recent coverage by the NY Times, affected customers could number over 60 million.

Data Breaches Cost More Than Your Reputation

The sheer scale of customers affected by Home Depot’s data breach surpasses last year’s title-holding hacker attack into Target’s systems – An ordeal that affected 40 million customers across the US and Canada.

And if that wasn’t embarrassing enough, Home Depot’s attempts to offer reconciliation include a paltry offering of identity protection and credit monitoring services, which hasn’t deferred customers in Georgia from already filing a class-action lawsuit against the retailer for failing to protect customers from fraud or alerting them in a timely manner.

With companies being held legally liable for the security of their customer’s data, is it any wonder that Facebook kicked off this year by building a Blu-ray storage system? Their 10,000 disc strong system amounts to over a petabyte of energy-efficient, secure data storage.

Digistor’s Solutions Back Up More Than Your Data

The NY Times has reported that

“The Department of Homeland Security and the Secret Service recently estimated that more than 1,000 businesses in the United States had been infected with malware that is programmed to siphon payment card details from cash registers in stores. They believed that many of these businesses did not even know they were sharing customers’ credit card information.”

NPR’s All Tech Considered has coined the phrase Data Breach-Fatigue` when discussing the overwhelming feeling of numbness consumers have regarding the repeated notifications businesses large and small to keep an eagle eye on their accounts.

“We are in the trough of disillusionment,” says Gartner security analyst Avivah Litan. “Over 1,000 retailers have been hit; it’s not limited to Home Depot. There are 999 others that no one’s talking about.”

As a business owner, the fear of a data breach increases with the knowledge that your system’s security is depended upon by others. And when faulty security has the capability to both cripple a company’s good name, and their bottom line if found responsible for restitution, you may find yourself turning to alternatives for secure data storage and archiving.